Zebra Nerite Snail - Neritina Natalensis

Pictures and information about some fresh water snail species.
* This is a view only forum*
User avatar
comp.wiz
Posts: 1018
Joined: Sat Apr 05, 2008 9:55 pm
Location: Dunstable

Zebra Nerite Snail - Neritina Natalensis

Postby comp.wiz » Thu Nov 06, 2008 10:26 pm

Common Names: Zebra nerite snail, Tiger nerite snail
Scientific Name: Neritina natalensis
Maximum Size: These snails have a maximum size of 2.5cm (1") shell and body length.
Temperature Range: Between 22°c and 26°c. Will only survive in tropical aquaria.
Water Parameters: These snails prefer alkaline water with a calcium supplement or other source of calcium added/present. If these two elements are not correct then their shells may start to dissolve resulting in eventual death of the snail. A of a pH between 7.0 and 8.5 is preferable. These snails have been recorded to have survived in both brackish and freshwater conditions.
Ease of Keeping: These snails are easy to keep but do require perfect water quality. These snails are fairly easy to keep, and can be kept in a small 15 litre snail/invert only tank. If kept in small aquariums either a good filter or regular 30% water changes are required. These (like all snails) will benefit from a calcium supplement being added to the water if no other calcium sources are present/available.
Origin: They are mainly found in Florida (USA) and Southern Africa.
Feeding: The diet of this snail mainly consists of algae and other vegetable matter. These snails will enjoy regular feedings of fresh vegetables (cucumber, lettuce). They have not been known to turn to live plants as an alternative food source. These are widely recommended as an efficient algae eater by local fish stores and aquarists alike.
Ease of Breeding: Breeding is impossible in the aquarium due to the complex breeding cycle.
Sexing the Snail: Distinguishing features between sexes are not yet known.
Breeding: As mentioned, breeding is impossible in freshwater due to the complexity of raising the young. Although, nerite snails will lay eggs that look like small sesame seeds of no more than 3mm in length. Some people are reported to have seen the eggs hatch, although they will never survive beyond the larvae stage.
Other Information: These snails tend to be more 'secretive' than apple snails and stick close to the glass (not exposing any flesh to fish). This makes them more suitable to be kept with fin-nipping fish (that would usually nip other snails tentacles). An aquarium with a lid is required as these snails have been known to exit the water.
Photo Credit: comp.wiz

Image

Image

Craig Woodland (comp.wiz)
Last edited by Guest on Sat Nov 08, 2008 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
Latin names always start with UPPER case and follow with lower case. Always 'Garra rufa' and never 'Garra Rufa' - http://abacus.bates.edu/~ganderso/biolo ... latin.html

Return to “Other Freshwater Inverts Profiles”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests